Courses

All undergraduate and graduate course offerings are listed below with faculty contact information.

Undergraduate Courses, Spring 2021

AEC 295: Global Conservation Ecology

T/R 1:30-2:45pm
ONLINE-SYNC

This course provides an introduction to the scientific principles and concepts that are the foundation of conservation science, with a particular focus on the ways in which justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion shape human relationships with nature. A diversity of topics will be covered, including 1) environmental and anthropomorphic pressures that threaten populations and ecosystems, 2) the importance of biotic and abiotic interactions for stability and resilience, 3) combining ecological theory with empirical data and community engagement to protect, preserve, and restore endangered species and ecosystems.  Students will build on their conceptual, analytical, and communication skills and practice real-world decision making through collaborative research projects, in which they will gather data and apply their findings to develop measurable conservation outcomes.

Contact Dr. Erin McKenney: eamckenn@ncsu.edu


AEC 360: Ecology

M/W/F 9:35-10:25am
ONLINE – SYNC

Ecology elucidates both the relationships between organisms and their environment, and the relationships among organisms. An understanding of ecology enables us to better understand how living organisms function and evolve within the context of the natural world. In this course, ecology is presented as a coherent scientific discipline; emphasis is on ecology as distinct from environmental science.

Contact Dr. Alonso Ramírez: laramir2@ncsu.edu


AEC 495/592.017 – Ecology & Conservation of Freshwater Invertebrates

M 10:40AM-12:30PM, W 12:50-15:35PM
ONLINE – SYNC

This course will introduce the student to the identification and ecology of freshwater invertebrates, with an emphasis on their life histories and adaptation to diverse freshwater habitats, significance to higher trophic levels, such as fish, ecosystem functioning, as a major source of freshwater animal diversity, conservation of threatened species, and application to bioassessment of water quality.

Contact Dr. Brad Taylor: bwtaylo3@ncsu.edu


AEC 420: Introduction to Fisheries Science

HYBRID – 50

Role of fish in aquatic ecosystems, fish biology, fish ecology, fisheries management and conservation. Emphasis on aquatic ecosystems and food webs, life history and ecology of important sport and commercial fishes, population and community dynamics, and theory and practice of fisheries management and conservation. Case studies from freshwater, estuarine and marine systems.

Contact Jessica Baumann: jrbrewst@ncsu.edu


AEC 424: Marine Fisheries Ecology

T/R 1:30-2:45pm; CMAST (Offsite Class in Morehead City)
F2F

This course is part of the semester at CMAST program and requires students to be on site in Morehead City, NC. The course covers the life history, stock concept, fishing gears, stock assessment approaches, fish-habitat relationship, socio-economics, and management of marine fishes. Several field trips to state and federal agency laboratories and fish houses/docks are used to emphasize fish sampling, biological sample processing, and gear design.

Contact Dr. Jeff Buckel: jabuckel@ncsu.edu


AEC 495/592: Environmental Issues in Aquatic Ecology

T/R 3:00-4:15PM
ONLINE – SYNC

Expanding population growth near lakes, rivers, estuaries, and coastal oceans is increasing pollution impacts on our nation’s freshwater and marine resources. An understanding of the scientific basis of impacts from nutrient pollution, toxic chemicals, acidification, global warming, overfishing, and related stresses, and the overarching policy/political controls, is critically needed to restore and optimally manage these systems, and to protect the health of humans who depend upon them for potable water supplies and fishery resources. This course fills a gap in current curricula by providing students with a working scientific knowledge of water quality issues related to cultural solutions where applicable. The course is designed for practical use by both science and non-science majors. These are issues that all citizens need to understand; they quietly affect each of us in everyday living.

Contact Dr. Joann Burkholder: jburk@ncsu.edu


AEC 495: Applied Science Communication

W 12:50-2:40PM
ONLINE – SYNC

A critical human dimension to all sciences is effective communication.  Students can expect to learn practical science communication tools and apply them to a variety of media while gaining experience creating pieces for real-world challenges.

Contact Michelle Jewell: majewell@nccsu.edu

Graduate Courses, Spring 2021

AEC 503: Foundations of Ecology

M 4:30-6:20PM
ONLINE – SYNC

Contact Dr. Becky Irwin

This course will introduce graduate students to the major concepts and theories in ecology.  We will cover population, community, ecosystem, and evolutionary ecology.  Students will critically evaluate classic and contemporary papers.  This class will also help participants prepare for their written and oral preliminary exams.  Remote participation via zoom/google hangouts is possible with permission by instructor.


AEC 495/592.017 – Ecology & Conservation of Freshwater Invertebrates

M 10:40AM-12:30PM, W 12:50-15:35PM
ONLINE – SYNC

Contact Dr. Brad Taylor

This course will introduce the student to the identification and ecology of freshwater invertebrates, with an emphasis on their life histories and adaptation to diverse freshwater habitats, significance to higher trophic levels, such as fish, ecosystem functioning, as a major source of freshwater animal diversity, conservation of threatened species, and application to bioassessment of water quality.


AEC 495/592: Environmental Issues in Aquatic Ecology

T/R 3:00-4:15PM
ONLINE – SYNC

Contact Dr. JoAnn Burkholder

Expanding population growth near lakes, rivers, estuaries, and coastal oceans is increasing pollution impacts on our nation’s freshwater and marine resources. An understanding of the scientific basis of impacts from nutrient pollution, toxic chemicals, acidification, global warming, overfishing, and related stresses, and the overarching policy/political controls, is critically needed to restore and optimally manage these systems, and to protect the health of humans who depend upon them for potable water supplies and fishery resources. This course fills a gap in current curricula by providing students with a working scientific knowledge of water quality issues related to cultural solutions where applicable. The course is designed for practical use by both science and non-science majors. These are issues that all citizens need to understand; they quietly affect each of us in everyday living.