Impact

Jul 19, 2019  |  Research

Sky-high climate change reshapes wildflower communities

I toppled a powerful nation's economy, wooed the god of the underworld, cost newlyweds thousands of dollars every year, and am right outside your front door.  Who am I?

Jul 10, 2019  |  Research

Increased Yeast Yields Bakethrough on Swelling Starters

Why do some starters rise to the challenge while others fall flat?  This question–and how best to answer it–troubled Dr. Erin McKenney during her postdoctoral research.

Jun 27, 2019  |  Impact

Applied Ecology Releases New Strategic Plan

The Department of Applied Ecology has launched a strategic plan effective through 2024. 

Jun 7, 2019  |  Uncategorized

Where Have All the Big Bees Gone?

Big-bodied bees, like carpenters, are everywhere in the spring.  Yet, now that summer has entered its full swing, carpenter bees have seemingly disappeared. Is this cause for concern?

Aug 7, 2017

Federal-University Partnerships, Renewed Funding Boost Climate Research

With five new university consortium partners and a renewed five-year funding award, NC State University will continue to host the Department of the Interior’s Southeast Climate Science Center.

Apr 15, 2016

‘Winner-Winner’ Behavior May Shape Animal Hierarchies

Researchers have developed a behavioral model that explains the complexity and diversity of social hierarchies in ants and which scientists believe may help us understand the nature of other animal societies, from primates to dolphins.

Feb 2, 2016

Antiperspirant Alters Skin’s Microbial Ecosystem

Wearing antiperspirant or deodorant doesn’t just affect your social life, it substantially changes the microbial life that lives on you. New research from NC State and others finds that antiperspirant and deodorant can significantly influence both the type and quantity of bacterial life found in the human armpit’s “microbiome.”

Apr 16, 2015

Fish Type, Body Size Can Help Predict Nutrient Recycling Rates

NC State University associate professor Craig Layman and colleagues show that ecologists can better predict the rates of how chemical nutrients are transferred by fish if they know the various fish species living in an ecosystem, along with the body size of the fish.