Impact

Jan 8, 2021

Bats With White-Nose Syndrome Choose Deadly Habitats

Bats afflicted with white-nose syndrome continue to chose deadly habitats, despite the consequences. This Nature Communications paper by Skylar Hopkins and team helps reveal an "ecological trap" set by an infectious disease.

Dec 8, 2020

Spring 2021 Fermentology Line-Up

Register now for the spring line-up of Fermentology mini-seminars and live Q&As with experts in fermented foods!

Dec 8, 2020

Farmed Striped Bass Without Hormones Or The Price-tag

Ben Reading and pals have developed a method for farming striped bass more efficiently and less expensively, without hormones.

Nov 30, 2020

Basic Bear Bowels Beget Barren Gut Biomes

Scientists have discovered that being a carnivore doesn't require as many guts as previously thought. 

Nov 19, 2020

Watch the 2020 Applied Ecology Minor Research Symposia

Congratulations to the 2020 Applied Ecology minors for these great talks! Watch them all here.

Nov 17, 2020

Ask an Ecologist: Do Monarch Butterflies Overwinter in North Carolina?

Elsa helps out Tamsin with her question about a late-season monarch she spotted in her garden.

Nov 10, 2020

Linnea Andersen Awarded Coastal Conservation Association Scholarship

Congratulations to Ph.D. candidate Linnea Andersen for being awarded the 2020 North Carolina Coastal Conservation Association's David and Ann Speaks Scholarship!

Oct 8, 2020

Where’s the Weak Link in Weakfish Conservation?

Weakfish have declined to record lows over the last 30 years. And despite a series of regulatory measures to reduce weakfish harvest, the stock has failed to rebuild...

Oct 2, 2020

Tips for Giving a Great Online Presentation

Investing time practicing the new art form of delivering a great online presentation is more important than ever, and this means rethinking how we use online conferencing software and taking advantage of new tools to engage our audiences.

Sep 28, 2020

Bees Can Limit Low-Level Parasite Spread Within Colonies

When parasite pressure is low, bees can control how quickly the parasites spread within colonies, and this might be due to social immunity.