plant biology

Jun 3, 2020  |  Research

Complementary Mutations: A Rollercoaster of Scientific Discovery

NC State researchers discover a new genetic mutation that could “fix” another mutation in the same gene, an enzyme involved in making a plant growth hormone — after a rollercoaster of ups and downs.

May 20, 2020

Goodnight Scholars to Join CALS

Four new students will explore their interests in biochemistry, sustainable agriculture, plant biology and horticulture, with support from a full-tuition scholarship.

May 6, 2020

Outstanding Senior Awards Go to …

Congratulations to all of the 2019-2020 College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Outstanding Senior Awards recipients.

Mar 15, 2018

Just-in-Time Tomatoes?

NC State scientists are exploring the molecular-level processes that cause tomatoes to ripen, and what they find could have big implications for a range of traits -- from flavor to firmness -- in fruit-bearing crops.

Apr 4, 2017

CALS Student Scientists Dance – With Research

CALS students push themselves beyond traditional science classes, and in turn, find fresh perspective and a much-needed outlet for stress relief and creative thinking.

Dec 11, 2016

Student Spotlight: Estefania Castro-Vazquez Uses Science To Serve

Estefania Castro-Vazquez is still exploring possible career goals, but her motivation is already clear: putting science to work to improve lives.

Nov 9, 2016

I AM CALS

Brooklynn Newberry wanted to be the first in her limited-income family to get a degree. When her first CALS application was deferred, she chose an alternate path.

Sep 29, 2015

Modeling tool IDs genes that control plants’ stress response

An interdisciplinary team of researchers from North Carolina State University and University of California, Davis has developed a modeling algorithm that is able to identify plant genes associated with specific biological functions. The modeling tool will help plant biologists target individual genes that control how plants respond to environmental stressors.

Jan 31, 2014

One size doesn’t fit all

A general cross-continent model to predict the effects of climate change on savanna vegetation isn’t as effective as examining individual savannas by continent, according to research published in Science this week. Savannas – grasslands dotted with trees – cover about 20 percent of the earth’s land and play a critical role in storing atmospheric carbon, says Dr. William Hoffmann, associate professor of plant and microbial biology at North Carolina State University and co-author of the study. “We wanted to find out what controls savanna vegetation – essentially the density of trees within the savanna – and whether we can use a single global model to predict what will happen to savannas if global temperatures rise,” Hoffmann said.

Mar 2, 2013

Interns learn valuable life lessons while studying tropical plant pathology in Costa Rica

Mary Lewis spent six weeks traveling around Costa Rica working on research designed to shed light on one of the most important diseases affecting bananas. While her focus was the fungal disease black sigatoka, the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences student says the experience taught her just as much – or more – about what it takes to work in a foreign country and to interact with people from other cultures.