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genetics

Leaves from a Flame thrower redbud

Nov 5, 2021

The Scientific Process of Creating the Flame Thrower™ Redbud

A behind-the-scenes look at a NC State breeder's process of creating an award-winning redbud. 

Oct 20, 2021

The Anatomy of a Giant Pumpkin

Brandon Huber, NC State alumnus, and Ricardo Hernandez, associate professor, share some of the science behind growing giant pumpkins that are displayed each year at the North Carolina State Fair. 

Seedlings with mutations in genes involved in making a plant growth hormone have curly cotyledons, the first two “leaves” of a plant shoot, or short roots. (Labeled seedlings on black)

Jun 3, 2020

Complementary Mutations: A Rollercoaster of Scientific Discovery

NC State researchers discover a new genetic mutation that could “fix” another mutation in the same gene, an enzyme involved in making a plant growth hormone — after a rollercoaster of ups and downs. 

Australian sheep blowfly against a white background.

Jun 7, 2018

Researchers Gain Insight Into Chromosome Evolution in Flies

By identifying a gene indispensable for males’ survival in a devastating livestock pest, North Carolina State University researchers have shed new light on the evolution of fly chromosomes. 

Woman holding a clear cube with 3-day-old corn seedlings.

Sep 19, 2017

Scientists Unravel Mysteries of DNA Replication in Corn

For the first time, scientists have characterized the DNA replication timing process for an entire plant genome. 

Feb 10, 2017

“Greater Good” Award to Boost Sweet Potato Research

A plan to shed more light on the complicated genetics of the sweet potato has garnered two NC State University scientists an Agricultural Greater Good Initiative Award from the genomics company Illumina. 

Feb 10, 2012

April Wynn chosen for Preparing the Professoriate program

As a CALS doctoral candidate in genetics and one of the newest fellows of N.C. State University’s Preparing the Professoriate program, April Wynn is a giant step closer to living her dream. 

Feb 10, 2012

Solving molecular mysteries

Over the years he’s spent studying cassava mosaic disease, Tanzanian scientist Dr. Joseph Ndunguru has noted something curious: Wherever there are DNA molecules called satellites associated with the geminiviruses contributing to the disease, symptoms are greater and losses are heavier – even in plants bred specifically to resist the disease. Figuring out more about those subviral particles could be key, Ndunguru believes, to developing a strategy to beat the disease for good. That’s why he has teamed with CALS’ Dr. Linda Hanley-Bowdoin on a project designed to yield the scientific insight necessary to do just that. 

Oct 6, 2011

Mackay wins North Carolina award

Dr. Trudy Mackay is among a group of distinguished North Carolinians who will receive the North Carolina Award, the highest civilian honor the state bestows, at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 10, at the N. C. Museum of History. 

Sep 28, 2011

Fly aggression involves complicated gene networks

Fruit fly aggression is correlated with smaller brain parts, involves complex interactions between networks of important genes, and often cannot be controlled with mood-altering drugs like lithium. Those are the results of a painstaking study conducted by researchers at N.C. State University and colleagues in Belgium.