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Lindsey Haynes-Maslow, PhD, MHA

Associate Professor​, University Scholar

Extension Specialist

4101 Beryl Road, 240C

Bio

Dr. Lindsey Haynes-Maslow is an Associate Professor and Extension Specialist in the Department of Agricultural and Human Sciences at NC State University.  Lindsey researches policies that lead to a healthy behavior. She is an expert on the intersection between food systems, nutrition and public health, as well as the impact of government policies driving the food system.  She has over 15 years of experience working with non-profit, private, and public organizations that focus on diet-related chronic disease prevention for low-resource communities.  Before coming to NC State, Dr. Haynes-Maslow worked for the advocacy organization, the Union of Concerned Scientists, on federal food and nutrition policy, specifically the Child Nutrition Reauthorization Act and The Farm Bill.  Currently, she is the Principal Investigator of NC State’s SNAP-Education program, Steps to Health.  She has a Ph.D. in health policy and management from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She also earned a Masters in healthcare administration and a B.S. in public health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Programs and Initiatives

Primary Teaching Responsibilities

  • AEHS 585: Professional Ethics & Family Policy

Contributing Websites

Professional Honors/Offices/Recognitions

  • 2020 – University Faculty Scholar
  • 2019 – Family Health & Wellness Award, North Carolina Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences
  • 2018 – Outstanding Program Accomplishment in Family Health & Wellness Award, North Carolina Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences
  • 2018 – Outstanding Program Accomplishment, Excellence in Teamwork Award, North Carolina Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences
  • 2013 – UNC Graduation Education Advancement Board Impact Award
  • 2010 – Public Health Traineeship Award
  • 2009 – UNC Student Undergraduate Teaching and Staff Award
  • 2009 – Public Health Traineeship Award
  • 2008 – James P. Dixon Award for Excellence in Education

Selected Publications

  • Gustafson, A., Gillespie, R., DeWitt, E., Cox, B., Dunaway, B., Haynes-Maslow, L., Steeves, E., Trude, A. C. B. (2022). Online Pilot Grocery Intervention among Rural and Urban Residents Aimed to Improve Purchasing Habits. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19020871
  • Jilcott Pitts, S. B., Wu, Q., Truesdale, K. P., Rafferty, A. P., Haynes-Maslow, L., Boys, K. A., … Laska, M. N. (2021). A four-year observational study to examine the dietary impact of the North Carolina Healthy Food Small Retailer Program, 2017-2020. International Journal of Behavioral nutrition and Physical Activity, 18(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-021-01109-8
  • Boys, K. A., Haynes-Maslow, L., McGuirt, J. T., Ammerman, A. S., Van Fleet, E. E., Johnson, N. S., … Pitts, S. B. J. (2021). Perceived barriers and facilitators to participating in the North Carolina Healthy Food Small Retailer Program: a mixed-methods examination considering investment effectiveness. Public Health Nutrition, 12. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980021003955
  • Haynes-Maslow, L., Pitts, S. B. J., Boys, K. A., McGuirt, J. T., Fleischhacker, S., Ammerman, A. S., … Laska, M. N. (2021). Qualitative perspectives of the North Carolina healthy food small retailer program among customers in participating stores located in food deserts. BMC Public Health, 7. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-021-11509-x
  • Chauvenet, C., De Marco, M., Leone, L. A., Haynes-Maslow, L., & Ammerman, A. S. (2021). The Role of Food Retailers in the Promotion of Healthful, Low-Cost Products to WIC Recipients. Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition, 16(2), 181–195. https://doi.org/10.1080/19320248.2019.1649225
  • Leone, L., Haynes-Maslow, L., Kasprzak, C., Raja, S., & Epstein, L. H. (2021, April 25). The WIC Shopping Experience: A Qualitative Study Examining Retail-based Strategies to Increase WIC Retention and Redemption Rates. Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition, Vol. 4. https://doi.org/10.1080/19320248.2021.1915906
  • Haynes-Maslow, L., Hardison-Moody, A., Patton-Lopez, M., Prewitt, T. E., Shanks, C. B., Andress, L., … Pitts, S. J. (2020). Examining Rural Food-Insecure Families’ Perceptions of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: A Qualitative Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(17), 6390. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176390
  • Haynes-Maslow, L., McGuirt, J., Trippichio, G., Armstrong-Brown, J., Ammerman, A. S., & Leone, L. A. (2020). Examining commonly used perceived and objective measures of fruit and vegetable access in low-income populations and their association with consumption. Translational Behavioral Medicine, 10(6), 1342–1349. https://doi.org/10.1093/tbm/ibaa077
  • Haynes-Maslow, L., Hardison-Moody, A., & Shanks, C. B. (2020). Leveraging informal community food systems to address food security during COVID-19. Journal of Agriculture Food Systems and Community Development, Vol. 10, pp. 197–200. https://doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2020.101.005
  • Andress, L., Shanks, C. B., Hardison-Moody, A., Prewitt, T. E., Kinder, P., & Haynes-Maslow, L. (2020). The Curated Food System: A Limiting Aspirational Vision of What Constitutes “Good” Food. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(17). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176157

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Education

BS Public Health University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

MHA Healthcare Administration, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

PhD Health Policy and Management University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Area(s) of Expertise

  • Food and Nutrition Policy
  • Chronic Disease Prevention
  • Community-Based Participatory Research
  • Diversity and Inclusion in Foods and Nutrition Programming
    • Grants

      Date: 06/01/21 - 5/31/23
      Amount: $199,760.00
      Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

      This project will build on the previous work and collaborations of NC State Extension in the COVID-19 Farmworker Vaccination Initiative and the work of EXCITE activity 1: NC NCSU - Me informo y Decido/I Get Informed and Decide: Extension COVID-19 Prevention and Vaccine Education for Farmworkers. This work focuses primarily on the workers themselves and mainly COVID-19 vaccination, this project will expand to add an emphasis on the whole family, education on several adult vaccines, social marketing approaches, and education on the importance of health and vaccination as tools to protect the family.

      Date: 04/01/21 - 5/31/23
      Amount: $169,179.00
      Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

      Overall the market research contractor will have the responsibility to train and assist in the development and use of marketing strategies utilized to reach priority populations in this project. This contractor will test the marketing of messages to determine the most effectives methodologies in delivering messages to priority populations.

      Date: 05/01/21 - 4/30/23
      Amount: $100,000.00
      Funding Agencies: Duke Endowment

      A majority of children under the age of six years old are enrolled in child care programs, where they consume a significant portion of their daily meals. It is essential that meals and snacks provided meet children’s daily nutritional requirements for normal growth, development, and maintenance of healthy body weight. However, research shows that child care meals and snacks do not adequately meet nutritional requirements. The Solid Rock Community Kitchen will address this issue by utilizing a central kitchen to prepare and deliver healthy meals to 10 local child care centers. The goals of the kitchen are to improve meal quality for young children, reduce workload on child care providers, provide a source of local economic development, and build community involvement. We propose to conduct a disciplined evaluation of the Solid Rock Community Kitchen to better understand best practices and disseminate this model to other communities across the state.

      Date: 10/01/21 - 9/30/22
      Amount: $26,380.00
      Funding Agencies: NC Small Grain Growers Association, Inc.

      We seek to empower North Carolina small grain growers by investigating additional avenues for selling North Carolina grown soft red winter wheat (NC SRW) and educating buyers and sellers in these alternative markets. Specifically, we are going to explore potential marketing strategies for NC SRW outside of the livestock industry. These potential marketing strategies include both promoting North Carolina grown SRW to local consumers and exporting North Carolina SRW through the Port of Wilmington. Although this may not have been as feasible in the past, North Carolina is uniquely poised to capitalize on both of these markets as the Port of Wilmington expands and the Plant Science Initiative at NC State provides opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration. Our team has expertise in grain transportation, marketing, production, mixed methods study designs, and consumer nutrition. Through this project we plan to address both local and international channels to increase marketing opportunities for NC SRW.

      Date: 10/01/21 - 9/30/22
      Amount: $2,817,300.00
      Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - Food and Nutrition Service (USDA FNS)

      The purpose of the SNAP-Education grant delivered by the Steps to Health team is to deliver nutrition and physical activity education to limited resource audience at the individual level and provide multi-level strategies/interventions to promote policy, systems, and environmental change across North Carolina, with 100 counties potentially receiving high levels of intervention.

      Date: 03/15/20 - 7/31/22
      Amount: $250,000.00
      Funding Agencies: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

      The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) provides supplemental foods, nutrition education, and referrals to health care and other social services to low-income pregnant and postpartum women, and infants and children up to 5 years of age whose household incomes are below a certain threshold and are found to be at nutritional risk. Although nutrition standards for WIC foods are set at the federal level, WIC state agencies identify the types, brands, and package sizes of foods that their participants may redeem with WIC benefits, and provide lists of WIC-allowable products to their recipients. WIC state agencies make decisions about eligible food product and approved retailers based on the need to balance program participation and cost containment. WIC is not an entitlement program, which means that state agencies have to adhere to strict budgets thus WIC state agencies contain costs through a variety of mechanisms including reducing or limiting the type/variety of WIC-eligible items or restricting reimbursement to retailers. A potential side-effect of regulations limiting WIC purchases to a select number of retailers or products is the potential to reduce program access, satisfaction, or redemption of WIC benefits. Although estimates vary, reports indicate that as few as 73% of infants, 38% of children, and 67% of pregnant and postpartum women who are eligible for WIC actually participate. Low participation rates may reflect a failure of eligible individuals to sign-up initially or decision not to re-certify after participating. Major reasons recipients fail to re-enroll include WIC office-level barriers (e.g., wait times and limited activities for children at WIC offices) and shopping barriers (e.g., difficulty identifying the correct size and type products). Limitations on WIC product eligibility may lead to limited product selection for recipients and difficulties identifying eligible products. These challenges may result in negative shopping experiences which could ultimately reduce redemption of WIC benefits among WIC recipients. Our previous research found that when using WIC vouchers, many customers avoided shopping for other items due to the amount of time it takes to find approved items and check-out with WIC vouchers. Participants also expressed frustration with changing WIC regulations, poor store signage, and staff that lacked knowledge about the WIC program. These challenges may be even greater for recipients living in underserved communities with limited food retail options. Retail-level strategies and interventions are needed to help improve redemption and retention rates, however there is currently no research available on the role of retailer-level interventions to improve WIC redemption and/or retention rates.

      Date: 01/25/21 - 12/31/21
      Amount: $10,000.00
      Funding Agencies: Share Our Strength

      This project consists of two primary aims and one exploratory aim: Aim 1. Determine the barriers and facilitators to online grocery shopping through a survey among rural and urban families in central and eastern Kentucky and North Carolina across rural and urban communities. Aim 2. Examine differences in purchases (healthy vs. unhealthy) and food security status between 1) online grocery shopping standard program offered through stores (Online); 2) online grocery shopping program plus nutrition educational text message prompts with recipes and meal planning ideas(Online + I); and 3) standard grocery shopping via brick and mortar (Standard). Aim 3. Examine changes over time in uptake of online shopping and percentage of SNAP dollars spent online within the region offering the USDA SNAP online pilot plus nutrition intervention vs those regions within KY and NC not offering the nutrition intervention.

      Date: 10/01/20 - 9/30/21
      Amount: $2,817,300.00
      Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - Food and Nutrition Service (USDA FNS)

      The purpose of the SNAP-Education grant is to deliver nutrition and physical activity education to limited resource audience at the individual level and provide multi-level strategies/interventions to promote policy, systems, and environmental change across North Carolina, with 100 counties potentially receiving high levels of intervention.

      Date: 12/15/18 - 12/14/20
      Amount: $30,035.00
      Funding Agencies: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

      Healthy corner store initiatives are one strategy to provide healthy options in underserved areas: National public health agencies have recommended that increasing healthy food access is one strategy to reduce unhealthy dietary habits and obesity, and healthy small store initiatives are one method to improve healthy food access. Healthy corner store initiatives are promoted as a way to address the obesity epidemic by providing healthier foods and beverages in small food stores where candy, sugary beverages, and processed foods are often purchased. In many low-income and rural areas, small stores may be the only food retail option available. Our study in eastern NC suggests that the amount of healthier foods in corner stores is lower in rural areas than urban areas, and that eastern NC customers would purchase healthier food if it was available. However, to our knowledge, no healthy corner store initiatives in the rural Southern US have been rigorously evaluated in terms of healthier foods and beverages stocked, purchased, and consumed and none of the interventions were the result of a state-level policy. We propose a quasi-experimental study to rigorously evaluate the public health impact of NC HFSRP on the retail food environment and weight-related dietary outcomes among customers. Before NC HFSRP implementation, in February – May 2017 we collected baseline data in 16 small food retailers, before any NC HFSRP stores received equipment or started stocking healthier foods: five that received NC HFSRP funds to install new equipment and stock and promote healthier foods in 2017 and 11 control matched stores.3 In February – June 2018, we again used internal funds to collect Year 1 follow up data in n = 8 stores (4 HFSRP stores and 4 control stores). This proposed project will fund data collection at subsequent time points with the following Specific Aims: Aim 1. Examine change in store-level availability of healthy foods and beverages in NC HFSRP and control stores. We will assess store-level availability using the Healthy Food Supply Score (HFSS), derived from the validated Nutrition Environment Measures Survey - Stores (NEMS-S). • Hypothesis 1: There will be greater improvements in the HFSS in HFSRP stores compared to matched control stores spanning a 2-year implementation period. Aim 2. Examine change in diet quality of customer purchases of foods and beverages from NC HFSRP and control stores. We will assess customer purchases using direct observations (“bag checks”) and calculate store-level Healthy Eating Indices (HEI) from aggregated data. • Hypothesis 2: There will be greater improvements in the store-level HEI as well as fewer sugary beverages purchased in NC HFSRP stores compared to matched control stores. Aim 3. Examine change in customer dietary behaviors in NC HFSRP and control stores. • Hypothesis 3: Greater increases in fruit and vegetable consumption and decreases in sugary beverage consumption in a cross-sectional sample of customers. Aim 4. Calculate financial return-on-investment for stocking healthier foods among small food retailers.

      Date: 10/01/19 - 9/30/20
      Amount: $2,817,302.00
      Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - Food and Nutrition Service (USDA FNS)

      The purpose of this grant is to deliver nutrition and physical activity education to limited resource audience at the individual level and provide multi-level strategies/interventions to promote policy, systems, and environmental change across North Carolina, with 74 counties receiving high levels of intervention.


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